Malta June 2022 – Trip Report

So, the Major put out the word that he was going to Malta and everyone was welcome. Having not been abroad for a couple of years due to the dreaded Covid we jumped at the chance…. and so did a quite a few others.

Sean flew out first on the Thursday with Dara and the little guy, Shea, mixing diving with a family holiday. His weather reports were great and also no problems at the airport….. even better.

The rest of us set off early Friday in a two different groups. Kelly, who had no sleep after finishing work late, drove Me, Kate and Dave up in his truck, parking at the drop and go service by T3. Really impressed and will use again.  A short bus rice to T1 and all good…. and that’s where it went to crap.

You will have to excuse my rants about Manchester Airport. It is without doubt, the worst airport I have ever had the misfortune to use and if there was any other option, I would go elsewhere. We’ve been to lots of airports in lots of countries over the years, from very small to very big, but non compare to the utter disorganisation and contempt that is shown to customers there.…. and that was before covid!

Easyjet advised arrival two and a half hours early, we were just short of three…. at 3.05am for a 5:55am flight. We got out the lift at the departure hall and had to join the sizeable carpark queue. No problem, we’ve got three hours and it was moving. An hour later we got inside and joined the bag drop queue, which was tolerable until the last 20 meters where it just became a scrum and a fight to get to the self-service bag drop machines and then out again to join another queue to drop the bags off. Another forty minutes gone and security still to go, was starting to get a bit twitchy now.

We then realised we were at the back of another massive queue just to get into the security hall. That did not move for ages then moved quickly until we were near the door…. and stopped….. typical. We did meet most of the others whilst passing along the ‘snake’, the Major, Gary, Sue, Jeff and Peter had arrived fifteen mins before us and that seemed to have bought them quite a lead.

Anyway, we finally got into the security hall to join another queue…. a very slow queue as there was only three open lanes out of about twenty….and only an hour to go. Very twitchy now. Nearly half an hour later they started pulling people out the queue who were going to miss flights, which thankfully included us. We were taken to another fast track channel only to be stopped by a moronic Asian girl with three carrier bags of liquid cosmetics arguing about taking them through….. duh.

Once we got her out the way it was the usual fight with the scanners, everything out of the bags and pockets into about ten different trays, trying to hold your pants up whist being scanned by hand even though you’ve just gone through a huge, very expensive looking, scanner. Then having a bag rejected because of a forgotten electrical item! Fortunately, another passenger had insisted on the manager coming over to get things moving and we persuaded him to push our bag through too.

So, we got through with about fifteen minutes left to take off, only to hear last call for us as the gate was closing…… wonderful…… we had to leg it through duty free and down to the Easyjet hall… to find our flight was right at the very end…. smashing…. I think we only made it as they didn’t want to delay the flight taking our suitcases off. We got our seats….. last ones on board.

Joke of an airport….. and end of rant.

After a thankfully normal flight we landed in Malta to thirty degrees and blue skies. After breezing through security and having retrieved our bags we were met outside by Steve (The General) and Howard from the Divewise team who had come to pick us up….. as well as Alan, the owner and another customer Steve who had both been on our flight as well.

Following a half hour drive we arrived at the Divewise center on the Westin Dragonara Complex in St Julian’s. The center is very well set up and managed by Alan’s better half, Viv, as well as a great team of very friendly and very competent staff, all I believe are instructors.

The first job, as usual with most centers, was to get a tote box and sort our dive gear out, fill out medical forms, make up weight belts and generally get ready for a shakedown dive. There we a few reprobates on our crew who had indulged on the way out so they were made to wait until the next morning for their shakedown dives.

There was a bit of a panic for me and Jeff when we were told that because of some of the answers on our medical forms we needed a medical sign off! Oh no! I had visions of sitting on the beach all week! But fortunately, this just involved walking five mins to a local chemist for a consult with a doctor. We did have to wait twenty mins as he was out on a call, but once back it was a five-minute check-up and thankfully everything ok for us both. Twenty well spent euros and we had our medical certificates. If only you could get that service in the UK!  

Back at the center, we kitted up and after a short walk over to the beach we got in with our guide Nadine. She ran us through a few mask clearing / reg recovery drills and then it was off out of the enclosed shallow area and into the deeper water. It was a bit choppy so not easy getting across and out of the entrance but fine after taht. The house reef is a nice dive but the water was a bit cooler than expected so we were glad of our lava core tops under our wetsuits. After a very pleasant forty-minute dive it was back to the center to wash the kit and put it all away, ready for tomorrow.

We were all staying at different hotels so most of the others only had a short walk but of us were fifteen mins walk away at the Cavalieri Art Hotel so the General very kindly gave us a lift over with the suitcases. After a very smooth check-in and getting a really nice room with a balcony and sea view we unpacked and went for a quick swim in the hotel pool and the last of the afternoon sun.

That evening, after a bit of a wander round, we strolled over to meet up with the rest of the crew at Long Rooms, an Irish Bar in the middle of St Julian’s. Despite seeming to be in the middle of all the action it was a nice pub and served food, so we stayed there to eat. The food was fantastic and very cheap, so everyone was happy! I had a Maltese platter which I hadn’t realised was a sharing platter when I ordered, it was huge, but I did my best. After being up at 1am we were flagging so headed back to the hotel early, don’t think we saw much after nine o’clock…

The next day was very relaxed for those of us who had done a shakedown. We didn’t have to be there until 11am, so we had a leisurely breakfast with Dave and Kelly at the hotel before setting off. Have to say the breakfast buffet at the hotel was fantastic, pretty much everything you could want including freshly cooked omelets…. took some restraint that week as wetsuits don’t stretch that much!

The walk to the dive center was a bit up and down but wasn’t a problem, although did get a little sapping as the week went on as the temperature got up well into the mid-thirties after Tuesday.

When we arrived the errant crew had completed their shakedown dives so it was just a matter of testing the mixtures in the cylinders and loading up. everyone was diving on Nitrox for the week so the lead instructor for each day insisted of everyone testing their own gas and filling in log sheets. Nice to see this, gives you some reassurance of a well-run center. After loading the cylinders and dive boxes on to the two trucks it was off for the fifty-minute dive to Cirkewwa at the top of the island.   

Side mount Sean in Cirkewwa dive carpark

There is parking at Cirkewwa which seems to be set aside for dive companies use, and as usual there were plenty there. Not sure how true it is but there are apparently 60+ dive companies on the islands. Anyway, we parked up, got kitted up and then climbed in via the steps and pool called Suzie’s pool, halfway down the prom. Quite slippy on the last few steps and on the entry which gave the Major had a few problems with his bionic hip, but we got there in the end.

The target was the P29 Patrol boat, a 52m former patrol boat for the Malta Armed Forces. She was made safe for divers and the environment then intentionally scuttled in August 2007 as a dive site. She lies upright on a sandy bed, 37m at the bow. Unfortunately, she is also 150m offshore which is a bit of a swim. 

Me and Kate had been Ocean Divers when we last came to Malta and hadn’t been allowed out to the P29 so we were really looking forward to this dive….. and it didn’t disappoint. Lisa and Alan (the Boss) were leading so we had to be on best behavior. We swam out at about 10-15m to conserve air but alsoto keep below the many jelly fish that were hanging around about 5m. So glad we had gloves and hoods on!

The vis was amazing, 30m+ and seeing the boat appear as we got closer was stunning. We landed on the deck and set off to swim round the superstructure. Needless to say, everyone scattered in different directions giving Alan and Lisa kittens trying to keep track of us all. With the swim and me only having 200 bar at the start we only really got time to swim around the upper deck once and then again 10m further up by the bridge before we had to turn round and start the swim back. I think about six of us headed back with Lisa with the rest, on twins and re-breathers, spending more time and coming back with Alan.

P29 Appearing out of the blue

The swim back at 10m is a bit boring and disorientating at times. More than once during the week, because of the lack of reference I felt like I was sinking when actually rising. Really had to concentrate on the dive computer to maintain the right depth. Closer to shore we hit the reef which surrounds Cirkewwa, and it gets more interesting. Lots of sea grass and clouds of Damsel fish make for a really pretty last five minutes swim and then safety stop in a partially enclosed area with about 7m depth. Then it was out via the same staircase and time to pack up the truck. Really enjoyed the dive, but as always, it wasn’t long enough. Was surprised looking back at video later how many fish there were, I was so blown away with a wreck that actually looked like a boat that I hadn’t really taken them in.

Before setting off we grabbed some lunch from the amazing snack van in the car park. Run by a really nice that did some amazing food. Wraps were fantastic and he will heat them on a hotplate for you. After that, we set off back to wash the kit and head back to the hotel for the last hour of sun and a swim by the pool.

The hotel has a buoyed off area in the sea next to the pool area, so I thought I’d go and do a bit of open water swimming. I’d remembered by googles for once so jumped in and started swimming up and down. Unfortunately, I’d total forgotten about the jelly fish and after about ten minutes kicked right into one. I’ve had a few stings before but nothing like this, it was like being electrocuted. Managed to get back to the side and run it under hot water but nothing really helped and it ended up in big red welts. They took days to go down then came back after a week or so and itched for days. This seems to be a feature as a few others got stung and had similar effects. I’ve still got scars from it now so will be sticking to the hotel pool or wearing a wetsuit if I ever go back in there again.

One of the many varieties of Maltese Jellyfish

By joint consent it was back to the long room for tea again that night. Chicken Caesar salad this time after recommendation from the night before and it was probably the best I’ve ever had. We were still tired so headed off early again, just dropping in at the ice cream shop on the way back….. just has to be done. Very nice it was too.

The next day was a full day with an 8:30 start at the dive center. The usual routine of testing the gas and packing the gear onto the trucks, then away for nine. Today we had the South African, Marinus, or Zafa as he was known driving our truck with Kevin the Swiss the lead instructor for the day driving the other. We were back to Cirkewwa again but for two dives this time.

The first was the tugboat Rozi, the smaller of the two wrecks there. She is still 35m long, complete, recognizable and sitting upright in about 34m to the sand. She was a working boat from the UK originally but like the P29 was scuttled as a diving attraction in 1992.

We went in off the dock by the carpark lighthouse this time, which is easier, but has a drop ranging from about six to ten feet depending on which part you jump from. This is a fair way kit on……. takes a long time from stepping off to hitting the water.

It was another 150m swim out, but was more prepared for it this time, took more time and arrived with a lot more air. Also, there is more of a swim over the reef on the way which was a bit more interesting.

The wreck again appeared in the distance, a complete boat sitting upright, even looked like a tug boat…. But even with the extra air there was only really time for a slow swim round the deck then another round the bridge before turning to head back in. Did notice the fish a lot more this time, hundreds of them, mainly damsel fish but some bigger stuff too.

Tug Boat Rozi Upper Deck

Once back at the reef we took a lot more time swimming over it and even had time for one of the swim through vertical tubes in the reef before heading back along to Susie’s pool to get out.

Back on the shore it was straight over to the food van for another tasty hot wrap and a cup of tea before switching tanks and getting ready to head back out to the P29 again. It was a smaller group for the P29 as most of the group decided to take a tour of the reef and arches instead.

With getting more into the swing of the swim out was it a better position again when we got there. Instead of dropping straight to the deck we headed forward at about 15m and dropped down on the bow. The front gun is still in place and a great spot to investigate. Taking our time and coming up slowly and taking a good look round the bridge and radio masts before joining up with the rest for the swim back.     

Kelly and Kate on the swim back

Another great day of diving. The vis was just as good as yesterday. Not sure exactly how far but could almost see the bow of the P29 from the stern and she’s over 50m long!

After getting back, washing kit and heading back to the hotel it was straight out to the pool for an hour again. Needed to cool down as it was way into the 30’s again. Dave and Kelly went for a snorkel in the sea pool but even wearing a mask and keeping a good watch out Kelly got stung on the arm by a jellyfish. Glad I stuck to the hotel pool.

That evening was a change of location. We arranged to meet at the Avenue, a sprawling restaurant that takes up a whole block, with five or six different rooms all decorated in different styles. I had the chicken kebabs which I can very much recommend.  We again only had a couple of drinks there then headed back via the ice cream shop.  Absolutely knackered with the heat and diving even though we were on nitrox. Some of the others headed back to the Long Room for a few more before turning in. 

Next day was a change of site and another half eight start. Today we were heading out to the other side of the island, to Wied Iz-Zurrieq, a small village located just next to the famous Blue Grotto caves. The target being the wreck of the Um El-Faroud. This is a 110m long oil tanker that was badly damaged in an explosion whilst in Valletta’s Grand Harbour. She was too badly damaged to be repaired so was made safe and scuttled as a diver attraction. She sits upright in 38m, complete but split in two towards the bow and has opportunities for exploring inside.

Kevin was driving us this time and Alan brought the other half of the group.  Fortunately, we managed to get parked right at the end of the road fairly close to the entry point as the hill is exceptionally steep and the main carpark is a good 500m further up!

The Quay at Wied Iz-Zurrieq

We had to carry all the kit down the hill and steps for about 30m to a quay next to where all the tourist boats tie up. Hard going even in just the morning heat. After kitting up and being warned by Alan that we couldn’t go inside the wreck… spoil sport….. we took a stride entry then went straight down to 10m. This was needed as the tourist boats are constantly passing and don’t really watch out for divers….

The wreck is again 150m offshore so yet another swim. This one is completely in the blue so really quite disorientating. Good job Alan was leading the way to give a point of reference. The wreck is amazing when it appears. A huge ship and we arrived, pretty much over the stern. We started by heading straight down to the prop and rudder as they were still attached. Massive, and impressive to swim round….but not for long at that depth. We came up and swam along the main companion way and out onto the main part of the deck. It’s a huge ship so could only just make out the broken section in the distance but been told there was not much up there, so we just came up the superstructure to the upper companion way on the other far side.

The Prop on the Um El-Faroud

Had a bit of a panic here as I lost Kate. I had thought we were going over the top and she though we were going straight on and whilst I was looking through a porthole she went. Had a search round but couldn’t see her so made my way up to the meeting point on the top of the superstructure. Nearly everyone else had gathered and Alan was swimming round constantly counting everyone and trying to keep track of us.  He the shot off to chase Peter who had missed the bit of the brief about not going inside! Anyway, Kate appears a few minutes later and with Perter chased out the inside we set off back to the wall.

A long swim again and following a safety stop under the dock, popped back up with 50bar left. Perfect. Climbing out on the sea wall ladders was a bit of an effort as was lugging the empty cylinders back up the steps and road to swap over and carry back down. The only thing for it was to head to the café further up the road for a wrap and the most amazing iced café ice cream drink.

The second dive was back to the El-Faroud again. This time Alan said that if we all behaved and did what he told us he would take us for a tour through the superstructure and down to the engine room. The only instruction was to keep following the diver in front and not to head up the funnel when we turned from the engine room to the way out.

All went well, we followed each other in through a number of rooms then down a quite tight staircases and corridors to the engine room. Really was pretty cool. Did get myself caught on a bit of something sticking out the floor at one point which slowed me down for a few seconds till I managed to free it. Anyway, not sure who but led the way but caught up just in time to see a The Major, Peter and Kate heading up the funnel…. great. Couldn’t catch their attention and was about to follow when Alan appeared and pointed the way out…. in a way that didn’t suggest a discussion. I followed the rest out and up to the top of the superstructure to the meeting point and we were joined a few minutes later by Alan and the other three who had come out the top of the funnel….. cool really.

Um El-Faroud Engine Room

Following another swim back and safety top under the dock, poped up but only with 40bar this time….. not so perfect. Anyway, then there was just getting out and lugging all the kit back to the trucks and loading up for the trip back…… after another iced café ice cream thing of course.

After washing and packing gear away were informed it was and early start next morning as we were going to Gozo…. Needed to be ready to roll at eight.

Given the good food the night before most of us agreed to go back to the Avenue again. Gary had taken a day off to go sightseeing with Sue but joined up with us again. Dave and Kelly went off for a meal together at a Greek taverna. Sean, Dara and Shea had started earlier to make sure the little one was ready for bed on time and so were in a different room.

We were in the very formal wood paneled room sat at a huge dining table. All very impressive. Again, the food was great, I had a chicken Caesar salad, I think.  Probably distracted with Gary’s immense Calzone! Never seen anything like it and although he did his very best it defeated him in the end.

The hard cases headed off to the Long Room for a nightcap but we headed back knowing there was an early start the next day….. and we needed an ice cream.

We were first down for breakfast at seven next morning for another really nice but quick breakfast before heading down to the diver center. We were there for half seven, had the cylinders tested and packed along with all the other gear bang on time. Off we went, heading for Cirkewwa again, but this time to grab the ferry. Mark was driving us, a customer really, but a regular visitor and also a dive instructor, following Ben in the front truck. We were lucky enough to drive right onto the ferry and after parking up, escaped the heat to the passenger compartment. The trip only takes about half an hour including docking at each end.

After a coffee we got back into the trucks and thankfully were out fairly quickly. It was so hot in the car deck. Anyway, five minutes into fifteen minute drive down to the site there was a minor disaster when Ben clipped a curb on a tight corner and the tyre exploded. No one hurt but the tyre and the wheel were done for. Everyone jumped out and set to trying to find the tools, jack and the spare wheel. This turned out to be under the van and the bolts were pretty seized. After a lot of effort Sean managed to get them moving but they then both eventually snapped off. Ah well, At least we had the wheel. Ten mins later we had the wheel changed and everything loaded up again and were off down the really narrow roads to Xatt l-Ahmar to dive on two of three wrecks that have been scuttled to create artificial reefs for divers.

There is a car park there but nothing else and it’s fair walk with all the kit down twenty meters of steps and across about a 100 meters of rock to reach the water entry point…. And in the mid-thirties. Gary and Perter did a great job of getting their kit and The Majors down there. Don’t think his bionic hip would have managed that.

Car Park and Entry at Xatt l-Ahmar

The first wreck was to be the MV Karwela, a 50m long ex passenger ferry scuttled in 2006. She is intact and sitting on sand at 41m at the stern. It’s been stripped right out allowing divers to swim the full length on different decks. Big holes are cut in the sides for easy exits and there is a really nice staircase towards one end.

Once kitted up, entry was down some awkward ladders which wasn’t easy, then it was just down and yet another swim out at 10m. The swim out wasn’t quite as far this time but not really any reef to break up the blue. With the bottom being around 40m we stuck to swimming round the middle and upper decks. Not as many fish on this one but really nice swimming along looking out all the windows.  The staircase was nice but didn’t fully appreciate it because of the direction we came at it. Would spend a bit more time there next time.

Inside the Karwela

After a bit more swimming around, and all too quickly it was time to head back. Could probably have stayed a little bit longer but we were starting to run into decco and didn’t have that much gas left so headed back, better safe than out of gas. After a safety stop by the ladders it was an awkward climb out and then time to lug cylinders back up to the trucks and fresh ones back down.

Side mount Sean posing over the bridge of the Cominoland

After a good break and some sandwiches we had brought from the boat we kitted up again to head out to the MV Cominoland. A 35m long former cruise ship also sunk in 2006. She sits upright on sand with a max depth of 41m. Again, she has been stripped out completely to allow divers to swim along two of her decks.

This time we persuaded Ben to let us swim out on the surface to save gas before going down. Although it didn’t look far and there wasn’t much of a current it took a fair amount of time. Probably explaining most guides reluctance to surface swim to the wrecks.

Down the chain to the Cominoland

Made a change going down the chain from the marker buoy and seeing the wreck appear from above. We swam the length of the middle deck and met Ben at the stern who pointed out some Nudibranch’s. Way to small for me to see but apparently very nice. After a swim along the top deck decco was again close so we headed back up to 10m and swam back in. A really nice wreck, not a lot of life but very scenic.

After the safety stop, climbing out and lugging the kit back to the trucks was glad of a rest whist we headed back to the ferry. Again, only a short wait and we were on and having a well-earned coffee in the onboard café…. Oh and getting a Gozo fridge magnet from the gift shop of course.

After the drive back and the washdown we joined the rest for a post dive drink at a bar outside the Majors hotel, the Vivaldi, before heading back to our hotel. Really were starting to feel the pace now. We met at the Long room again and decided to stay there for food, we had a table outside and were too tired to move really. Forced myself to eat another Maltese platter then we left everyone else to have more drinks whilst we headed to the ice-cream shop and the hotel.

The next day was another early start as we were going out on a boat for a change. Also, it was the Majors birthday….75! Viv had organised a cake so we embarrassed him a bit, well as much as you can, then left him to put his kit together. He and Gary were diving on twins this day as a warmup to get ready for a deep dive they had planned with Alan for the Friday. Sean wasn’t with us today as he was flying back the next day and was spending the day with the family.

Happy Birthday Major

Once the cylinders were analysed and everything was loaded up we set off for the twenty-minute drive to the quay at Qawra. Alan was leading the overall group with Ben and Joe driving the trucks. The surprise was that the boat was a large traditional fishing boat converted for diving and party trips. Very nice. We got everything we needed aboard and set off, starting to kit up on the way.

Kitting up on the way out

We were diving the Imperial Eagle, a 45m long ex ferry and cargo ship which lies about a mile off the quay on a sandy bed at a max depth of 45m with the main deck at 32m. She is another purpose sunk wreck, scuttled in 1999 as an artificial reef and as part of a marine conservation area. Also, off the bow of the ship is a large reef which has a large Statue of Christ a short swim into it.    

Alan must have begun to trust us as Me, Kate, Dave, Kelly and Peter were left to our own devices whist he, Ben and Joe took Alan and Gary in along with Jeff and a couple of other customers doing technical courses.

There is a special buoy marking the wreck, and we were supposed to follow this down and head off on a baring from the block at the bottom to find the wreck. However, as we started going down we could see the wreck from about 15m down the chain! Absolutely amazing. We headed for the stern and swam along the full length of the deck which has been opened up to a long swim through. Really nice with plenty of fish along the way.

Arriving on the Imperial Eagle

 Once on the bow we headed off to find the statue. Bit nerve racking heading off into the blue at depth but it only took about five minute to spot it and swim over. At about four or five metres tall it’s quite impressive so we spent a while posing for photos before turning back for the wreck. As we got there, we only really had enough time for a quick look at the bridge before heading off to the chain to begin our assent. Fantastic heading up and seeing all the twin set and unit divers still swimming round…. only a bit jealous.

Kristu tal-Bahhara (Christ of the Sailors) and Peter

Back onboard we had just about sorted our kit out by the time the others started popping up. Took a bit to get the Major out as the ladder climb up to the boat was hard work but they managed it and we headed back to shore and then center.

Recovering the Major

For the afternoon it was just the five of us again, the rest taking time off after the morning dive. This time Alan was taking us off to the walls of Valletta to dive on a wreck that had been sunk during the war. HMS Maori was a British destroyer that took a direct hit to the engine room whilst moored there in 1942. She was eventually allowed to sink just of Fort St Elmo in about 15m of water. She has taken quite a battering over the years and there is now only a few recognisable bits left.

We had been warned to only bring essentials as the dive trucks were targets for the local lowlife so nothing should be left on show and there was no boot. After parking up at the side of the road entry was just climbing down a couple of steps and into the water. Nice, no big swim.

It was a very relaxed swim over the reef and at no more than 15m for the whole dive. Very nice after all the deeper stuff. The vis was a bit murky at only 10 to 15 meters…. wow, soon forget UK diving! There wasn’t really much of a boat to see, mostly chunks of plate with a few larger sections still visible.  What looked like a gun at one point and part of the bridge you could swim through. But there was loads of life, lots of fish and quite a few octopus but they couldn’t be tempted out. Was really hoping to see one of the sea horses found there but no such luck. Alan did manage to drag us out after just short of an hour and took us on a scenic dive back taking in most of sights around the outskirts of Valletta. Very nice afternoon.

Alan waiting for us outside a small entry point on the HMS Maori

Once back we stopped for a quick one in the bar outside the Vivaldi again before heading back to get ready for the evening. Gary and worked with Viv to organise a well-known Indian called the Emperor of India, mainly for the Majors birthday and partly for us to say thanks to Viv and Alan for looking after us all week. The meal was really good, plenty of different curries and bread on offer. Sean, Dara and Shea had joined us for their last night and the little guy was good as gold. The Major got another cake, this time with a sparkler. Everyone was happy…. and we were very happy after an ice-cream on the way back.  

More Birthday Celebrations

So, the last day had come. The famous five were in a group together with the lovely Lisa driving and keeping us under control. We headed back to Cirkewwa for yet another go at the P29 and for a reef swim round the harbour later.

This time the P29 was absolutely covered in fish, big, little and shoals. No idea what most of them were but looked amazing. Lisa guided us down through the deck this time, along a couple of corridors and through a couple of rooms, really good. We then followed her through some of the superstructure and back out nearer the bridge. When we all re-grouped around the mast it was like an aquarium, so many fish. Superb diving.

P29 Looking Down on the Fish from the Bridge

After the obligatory wrap from the snack van it was back out for the last dive. Up and down the Cirkewwa reefs. There had been some very noticeable thermoclines during the week but once you pushed through you didn’t really notice the cold. Probably as most of the dives involved a good swim to warm up first. But we all noticed it on this last dive. Probably a mixture of fatigue catching up mixed with the leisurely pace. Lots to see on the reefs, plenty of fish, jellyfish and the odd octopus hiding in holes and lots of nice sea grass. Lisa took us through a couple of swim throughs and then onto the large arch. A great spot to swim round for photo opportunities. After this it was back along to Susie’s pool for a safety stop and to warm up.

That was the diving done. Just back to wash up all the kit and put it out to dry ready to be packed up later. We wandered up to the bar to meet up with the others, back and buzzing from diving the HMS Stubborn. A pretty much intact WW2 British submarine lying a couple of miles of Quwra on a sandy bottom and at 56m. Not a bad effort for a 75 year old…… with plenty of help from Gary I suspect.

The Major at 56m on HMS Stubborn

Anyway, the last evening wasn’t as messy as it could have been after starting with two bottles of bubbly in the Major and Peters room. But we then we did follow it with a very civilized meal at the Avenue, in yet another room. The Calzone defeated Gary for a second time, and I had the chicken kebabs again…. very nice too. After a last drink at the Long Room, we called it quits and headed back via the ice-cream shop…. Good job it was the last night, the staff new us now!

Next morning the general picked us up from the hotel after breakfast and we played Jenga with all the dive gear trying to fit it back into the suitcases. Once done we said our goodbyes to the team and The General and Howard drove us back to the airport. After no more than fifteen minutes to drop the bags and then ten minutes through security (are you listening Manchester Airport!) we were ready for the flight home, after a bit of real duty free.

All in all, think everyone agreed, this was a really great trip. Really good diving, great dive centre and staff and best of all great company. Thanks to the Major for getting it all started and to everyone else for making it such an enjoyable trip. Roll on the next one…….

The crew, The Major, Gary and Sue Horsman, Peter Bever, Jeff Jones, Sean, Dara and Shea Cafferkey, Dave Barlow, Kelly Baird, Kate Mills and myself, Chris Mills.

Some of the crew after the bubbly!

If you’ve made it this far well done for putting up with my ramblings and hope its given you an insight into diving in Malta with Divewise.

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